Trusting God in the Wilderness: an invitation

The 40 days of the Lenten Season (leading up to Easter) are a time in which we are invited to join Jesus in His 40 days of temptation the wilderness. Mark 1:13 offers the note that Jesus was with the wild animals during this time which is certainly a detail to remind us that it wasn’t a sweet little time of resisting temptation. The environment alone was wilderness as was the experience of temptation and fasting.

Adele Calhoun shares: 

“Jesus began his ministry with forty formative days of solitude. No doubt Jesus intended to commune with God alone, but he also encountered the tempter in that desert place … Solitude is a formative place because it gives God’s Spirit time and space to do deep work. When no one is there to watch, judge and interpret what we say, the Spirit often brings us face to face with hidden motives and compulsions. The world of recognition, achievement and applause disappears, and we stand squarely before God without props.”  Spiritual Disciplines Handbook, p. 129

We often find ourselves in such a desert place. It feels harsh and unfamiliar. We might feel the compulsion to escape and run to more familiar landscape, but we are invited by God to stay where we are for it is in those dry, desolate, lonely places that the Father does some of His best work. It is in those places where our souls become dry and thirsty, unwilling to settle for clichés and easy answers. The stripping and unmasking of the desert are good for our souls. If we desire God, the wilderness is where transformation occurs.

Whether we are on a wilderness season currently or not, the Lenten season invites us to be in the wilderness with Jesus and to shaped by the Spirit through introspection, releasing, and deepening trust. This year, during the 40 days of Lent, I’d like to invite you to daily journey in the wilderness with God.

In 1 Corinthians 10:1-13, we are encouraged to revisit Israel’s time in the wilderness and how such a season did not go well for them. This passage in 1 Corinthians walks through various areas such as desires, relational patterns, trust, and expectations. 

If you decide to join me on this journey, here’s what you can expect … a daily devotional, weekly prayers, and weekly invitations to various spiritual practices.

Sign up to receive the daily devotional starting Feb 17: http://eepurl.com/uG_Df

If you get a response to this “registration form” which says you are already on this list, you are likely on our general list for desertdirection.com. Let me know (ted@tedwueste.com) and we’ll make sure you are on this list well.

About Ted Wueste

I live at the foothills of the Phoenix Mountains Preserve (in Arizona) with my incredible wife and our golden doodle (Fergus). We have two young adult children. I desire to live in the conscious awareness of the goodness and love of God every moment of my life.

Posted on February 2, 2021, in blog, Lent 2021. Bookmark the permalink. 3 Comments.

  1. May God continue to bless you and the leaders in our country. May we see God at every turn and in every event.

  2. Jayme Montgomery

    Listen, I’m on Day 10. I started out reading 1 passage every week or 2 weeks. Now it’s every day. This is the best devotional I’ve ever done. The way you are in my sauce and on my front porch telling all my business is ridiculous 😊 Talking about sin through the frame of desire, yes!!! And we need to bring all desires to God, and again I say Yes! It’s also very affirming to my current wilderness experience and how I’m being led to handle it. I have a huney and we are in a weird space. Keep asking God how to handle things and just not really hearing anything solid. Get to Day 10 where you write “God leads us and He takes the initiative.” And there’s my answer. When it’s time to go, God is loud and clear, lol. I love God for directing me to this blog. And thank you for being His servant. I pray for your continued strength. Ik what I went through to get here. So I can only imagine the experience(s) that brought you this divine understanding and knowledge. Thank you 🤎

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